A unique range of ripening and aromatic cultures for dairy applications.

The Yeasts Debaryomyces Hansenii (DH) and Kluyveromyces Lactis (KL)

The growth of yeast significantly contributes to the de-acidification of the rind via lactic acid/lactate consumption, which in turn allows for the development of acid-sensitive ripening flora such as coryneform bacteria. Through their enzymatic activities, yeasts prevent possible bitterness in the curd, product volatile compounds, and especially fruity flavors.


Geotrichum Candidum

Consumes lactic acid to form a mycelium that further fragments into arthrospores and develops a thin rind. It grows rapidly and early in the ripening stage, reducing the risk of contamination with spoilage microorganisms. Finally, it has peptidase activities that reduce bitterness and release aromatic compounds such as methyl ketones, alcohols, and free fatty acids.


Staphylococcus Xylosus

Develops mostly on the cheese surface after the salting step and remains through the ripening process of
smear-ripened, washed-rind or bloomy rind soft cheeses. Through their enzymatic activities, they contribute
to both the texture and flavor of cheese.


Brevibacterium Spp.

A coryneform, salt tolerant, aerobic, and often pigmented bacteria. Brevibacterium linens strains are pigmented and responsible for the orange color development at the cheese surface while Brevibacterium aurantiacum strains are
non-pigmented and develop a creamy color. Brevibacterium development occurs later in the ripening process after
de-acidification of the curd by microorganisms such as yeast and Geotrichum candidum. It significantly contributes
to the cheese organoleptic properties by producing aroma in particular sulfur compounds such as methanethiol
and thioester.


Propionibacterium freudenreichii

A ripening culture used in Swiss type cheeses to create eye formation. The FLAV-ANTAGE® PF06 produces a balanced flavor and resists very well to difficult production process conditions (heat).


FLAV-ANTAGE® Range

Applications Product Key Features
Staphylococcus Xylosus
Washed-Rind and Smeared Soft Cheeses MIC2
  • Softens the curd and produces fruity flavor notes.
  • No impact on surface color.
XULY
  • Softens the curd and produces fruity flavor notes.
  • Delivers an orange surface (earlier than Brevibacterium l.).
Yeasts
Semi-Hard Cheeses DHF
  • De-acidifies the surface for other culture(s) to grow.
  • Produces mild fruity and creamy flavor notes.
  • Contributes to the control of undesirable flora.
Lactic and Soft Cheeses DHR
  • De-acidifies the surface for other culture(s) to grow
  • Produces strong fruity flavor notes.
  • Contributes to the control of undesirable flora.
Most Cheese Technologies KL
  • Softens the curd.
  • Reduces bitterness.
  • Limits post acidification.
Geotrichum Candidum
Soft and Semi-Hard Cheeses GCA
  • Delivers an intermediate, white surface.
  • Produces sulfur compounds and fruity flavor notes.
Bloomy Soft Cheeses GCB
  • Delivers an intermediate, white surface.
  • Produces sulfur compounds and fruity flavor notes.
GCM
  • Delivers a filamentous, white surface.
  • Produces fruity and mild creamy flavor notes.
Camembert, Goat, and Pressed Cheeses GCC
  • Delivers a slightly wavy, intermediate, white to creamy white surface.
  • Produces fruity, flowery and strong cowshed flavor notes.
GCD
  • Delivers a thin, yeast-like, wavy, creamy white surface.
  • Produces fruity and intense creamy flavor notes.
Brevibacterium Spp
Washed-Rind and Smeared Soft Cheeses BLE3
  • Delivers a beige orange surface.
  • Produces sulfur compounds and strong cowshed flavor notes.
  • Dry non-sticky touch.
BLIC
  • Delivers a red orange surface (intensified when used during cheese wash).
  • Produces fruity and creamy flavor notes.
BLO
  • Delivers an orange surface (stable).
  • Produces fruity flavor notes.
  • Wet sticky touch.
BLA1
  • Develops a creamy white surface (apigmented strain).
  • Produces distinctive fruity aromas.

To order, contact our Product Specialists today: (800) 826-8302 or sales@nelsonjameson.com.