According to the NSF Nonfood Compounds Registration Program “NSF is based on meeting regulatory requirements including FDA 21 CFR for appropriate use, ingredient and labeling review. Rated soaps and sanitizers are acceptable for use in and around food processing areas.” Nelson-Jameson recommends using NSF rated products while in food production areas. The NSF Nonfood Compounds Registration Program is a continuation of the USDA product approval and listing program.

Examples of products, which are not NSF rated for use in food processing, may include soaps and sanitizers containing fragrances and dyes. See our NSF rated products below:

 


E2 Hand Soaps

Acceptable for use as a hand washing and sanitizing compound for use in and around food processing areas. Dispenser should be located a sufficient distance from the processing line to prevent accidental product contamination. Wash hands with an adequate amount of soap and rinse with running filtered water. It is recommended to follow with an E3 Rated Hand Sanitizer.

 


E3 Hand Sanitizers

Acceptable for use as a hand sanitizing product in and around food processing areas. Dispenser should be located a sufficient distance from the processing line to prevent accidental product contamination. To be used after adequately washing hands with an E2 Rated Hand Soap. Provides pathogen protection beyond what hand washing alone can do.

 


Hand Sanitizers & Gloved Hands

Hand Sanitizers and Gloved Hands

Shop Gloves

Hand sanitizers do not replace hand washing. Hand Sanitizers are meant to be used on bare hands after properly washing hands. Food handlers and/or Food Production Facilities should select an E3 rated hand sanitizer. According to current FDA requirements, Alcohol hand sanitizers must contain 60-90% alcohol and state their percentage of alcohol on the product label.

When using gloves, wash and sanitize hands first with an E3 rated hand sanitizer, then apply gloves. If you choose to sanitize gloves, this should be done using a D2 Food Contact Approved surface sanitizer. Gloves are considered a surface, and as such should follow the same protocols for sanitizing food contact surfaces.


Hand Hygiene Video Resources

For additional information on Hand Hygiene, view the FDA Employee Health and Personal Hygiene Handbook.